Last edited by Zumi
Tuesday, July 14, 2020 | History

3 edition of Phonological relationships in Caribbean and West African English. found in the catalog.

Phonological relationships in Caribbean and West African English.

J. C. Wells

Phonological relationships in Caribbean and West African English.

by J. C. Wells

  • 38 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by John Benjamins in Amsterdam .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Offprint from English world-wide, 8, 1.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13940812M

  The varieties of English spoken in the Caribbean give us a fascinating insight into the way languages emerge and evolve when people from different cultures come into contact. From the early s, thousands of people were transported as slaves to the Caribbean, particularly from West Africa. As a result a number of pidgin languages developed. A. Phonological Relationships in Caribbean and West African English. Article. Jan to see what this reveals about the historical relationship between the Author: Andrei Avram.

Owomoyela's portrait points to the major impact of West African literature on the evolution of both African and world literatures in English. Sure to become the definitive text for research in the field, The Columbia Guide to West African Literature in English Since is a vital resource for newcomers as well as for advanced scholars seeking Cited by: 7. The other feature of sentence (5)--the absence of a possessive -s, and reliance on the adjacency to express the possessive relationship, is found throughout the Caribbean and West African pidgins and creoles, and in pidgin/creole languages (resulting from mixture and simplification in language contact) more generally.

The English Origins Hypothesis (EOH) runs in opposition to the Creole Hypothesis. This hypothesis has been described as the Neo-Anglicist original Anglicist Hypothesis, a position held by dialectologists in the mid twentieth century, revolved around the relationship between African American and European American vernaculars in the rural South (see . Publications Books. Language and Liberation: Creole Language Politics in the Caribbean,[New Expanded Edition with new 70 page updating chapter] Arawak Press: Jamaica, , pages.; Talking Rhythm, Stressing Tone: Prominence in Anglo-West African Creole Languages, Arawak Press: Kingston, , pages.; Talking in Tones: A Study of Tone in Afro .


Share this book
You might also like
How to overcome the 101 most frequent objections in selling real estate

How to overcome the 101 most frequent objections in selling real estate

This small world of mine

This small world of mine

Fibres and textiles

Fibres and textiles

Bills to authorize prosecution of terrorists and others who attack U.S. government employees and citizens abroad

Bills to authorize prosecution of terrorists and others who attack U.S. government employees and citizens abroad

The wolf

The wolf

life of forms in art.

life of forms in art.

China Briefing, Nineteen Eighty-Eight

China Briefing, Nineteen Eighty-Eight

prefects: British leadership and the public school tradition

prefects: British leadership and the public school tradition

Aridic soils and geomorphic processes

Aridic soils and geomorphic processes

The Boston collection of womens poetry

The Boston collection of womens poetry

Chanukah

Chanukah

Agricultural Lending

Agricultural Lending

Phonological relationships in Caribbean and West African English by J. C. Wells Download PDF EPUB FB2

This chapter describes the history, role, and structural properties of English in the West African countries the Gambia, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Ghana, Nigeria, the anglophone part of Cameroon, and the island of Saint Helena.

It provides an overview of the historical phases of trading contact, British colonization and missionary activities and describes the current role of English in these Cited by: 1.

Pidginised English was used in the slave trade in West Africa and brought to the Caribbean by African slaves and the British slavers and settlers who dealt with them. A Creole results when a pidgin is adopted as the first language of an entire speech by: Books. Forthcoming titles; New in paperback; New titles by subject; April ; Phonological Relationships in Caribbean and West African English.

J.C. Wells. 61–67 Studies in Phonological relationships in Caribbean and West African English. book Geography: the Dialects of English in Britain and Ireland.

Reviewed by Martyn F. Wakelin. – K.M. Petyt, Dialect and Accent in Industrial West. Phonological and Phonetic Characteristics of African American Vernacular English Erik R. Thomas* North Carolina State University Abstract The numerous controversies surrounding African American Vernacular English can be illuminated by data from phonological and phonetic variables.

However. English in East Africa is a well-developed usage variety (or a cluster of usage varieties), although it is not as indigenized as in West Africa, for instance, because many functions in the language repertoire are still taken over by Kiswahili and other African languages. The debate on developing an independent norm is not prominent, although at least English in Kenya could be classified Cited by: 2.

WEST AFRICAN ENGLISH, short forms WAfrE, WAE. English as used in West Africa the official language of NIGERIA, GHANA, SIERRA LEONE, GAMBIA, and is typically acquired as a second, third, or fourth language, and the line between English as used by a small élite and the more general WEST AFRICAN PIDGIN ENGLISH is difficult to draw.

The pidgin, which included elements of the West African languages and English, was not made up of function words, like articles or prepositions until it developed into a creole over time [3]. Children of those who speak pidgin were born and the. David L. Lawton’s text “English in the Caribbean” and the book Linguistic Variation in Jamaica: A Corpus-Based Study of Radio and Newspaper Usage by Andrea Sand will form a useful basis for the study of the English language in Jamaica and.

groups, namely first-language English (EL1), an opaque orthography (n=42) and second-language English with first-language one of the nine official African languages of South Africa (EL2), a transparent orthography (n=37). The primary aim was to examine the relationship between phonological awareness (comprising.

African languages and phonological theory Larry M. Hyman University of California, Berkeley 1. Introduction I’ve been asked to write about the mutual influence of African languages and phonological theory, specifically addressing two questions: What and how have African language contributed to phonological theory?File Size: 66KB.

This authoritative introduction to African American English (AAE) is the first textbook to look at the grammar as a whole. Clearly organised, it describes patterns in the sentence structure, sound system, word formation and word use in by: Caribbean English dialects of the English language are spoken in the Caribbean and Liberia, most countries on the Caribbean coast of Central America, and Guyana and Suriname on the coast of South ean English is influenced by the English-based Creole varieties spoken in the region, but they are not the same.

In the Caribbean, there is a great deal of variation in the way English. the purported influences of an African legacy on the morphological, syntactic, and especially phonological components of Caribbean Span-ish, which have had dialectologists divided in an on-going debate for almost as long as these two cultures have been in contact.

There are those in favor of a predominant and evident AfricanFile Size: KB. MAUREEN WARNER-LEWIS is Professor of African-Caribbean Language and Orature in the Department of Literatures in English, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica.

SABRA WEBBER is an Associate Professor, with a joint appointment in the Departments of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures and Comparative Studies in the Humanities at the Ohio. V.S. Naipaul may be a Caribbean author but his A Bend in the River is not set in the Caribbean, as it's set in Africa (the Congo).

It has been removed, as it doesn't match the description of this list ("For fiction and poetry about or set in the Caribbean"). African and Caribbean men and mental health Article (PDF Available) in Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care 2(2) August with 1, Reads How we Author: Frank Keating.

Listened to the book, which was certainly a different experience than reading it would've been. Learned quite a bit about the African Diaspora in the West Indies and the struggles in blending and interacting with different cultures, races, and religions/5.

This book is about the close historical and linguistic relationship between the languages of Surinam and Benin, a relationship which can be viewed in terms of a Trans Atlantic Sprachbund or linguistic area.

It consists of a detailed analysis of various possible substrate and adstrate effects in a number of components of the grammar, in the Surinam Creole languages, primarily. A term used in many discussions of the social and political position of African American English.

The term is specifically connected with the debate, unleashed by a controversial decision by a school board in Oakland, California inabout whether African American English is so different from General American English to warrant teaching it as a separate language.

Martin Japtok is an assistant professor of English and African-American studies at West Virginia State College. He has published essays on African American, Afro-Caribbean, and Jewish writers and on matters of race, ethnicity, and identity in African American Review, MELUS, The Southern Literary Journal, and Literature and Medicine.

African-American Vernacular English (AAVE, / ˈ ɑː v eɪ, ˈ æ v /), known less precisely as Black Vernacular, Black English Vernacular (BEV), Black Vernacular English (BVE) or colloquially Ebonics (a controversial term), is the variety of English natively spoken, particularly in urban communities, by most working-and middle-class African Americans and some Black ity: African Americans, Black Canadians.

Chapter 2, "African Agency in the Emergence of the Atlantic Creoles" (by Faraclas and eight co-authors), refutes conventional assumptions about colonial societies--in particular, Eurocentric notions of monolingualism in the Caribbean, classifications of African languages that overlooked hybridity, and monocausal scenarios for language.The writer, this book, and its author are exemplary choices to inaugurate this new series of African and Caribbean literary studies." Research in African Literatures "C.L.

Innes's book is a capable, appreciative analysis of Chinua Achebe's novels and a summary of his short stories, poetry, essays, lectures, and children's stories."Price: $